Dan

99

29 posts in this topic

Bismillah

As Salam alaikum

Insha'Allah this will be a humble undertaking of the 99 names of Allah. I started a new thread in order to in sure congruity. Be forewarned that I will edit out posts that do not add to the information here, eg "Great post." If someone has more information about a particular Attribute or Name of Allah, please please post it in order for us all to benefit, insha'Allah

1) ar-Rahmân

The Most Lovingly Beneficent, The Most Kind and Giving, The Most Gracious, The Infinitely Good

The One who continually showers all of creation with blessings and prosperity without any disparity. The One who is most kind, loving and merciful.

The One whose endless, loving mercy is perfect and inclusive. The One who is overflowing with the quality of loving mercy and is continually pouring it upon all of creation.

The One whose perfect mercy and loving beneficence endlessly embrace all of creation. The One who loves and cherishes all of creation. The One who is most loving, gentle and merciful.

From the root r-h-m which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to have tenderness, gentleness, kindness

to love

to have mercy, to have pity

to show favor and goodness

to have all that is required for beneficence

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 1:1

The root r-h-m also indicates womb; meaning that which provides protection and nourishment, and that from which all of creation is brought into being.

Rahmân conveys the idea of fullness and extensiveness, indicating the great quality of love and mercy which engulfs all of creation without any effort or request on our part, while Rahîm conveys the idea of constant renewal and giving liberal reward to those who are deserving.

Al-Rahmân is the Beneficent One whose endless outpouring of love and mercy are continually showered upon all of creation, while al-Rahîm is the Merciful One whose love and mercy are manifested as that which is received as the consequence of one's deeds.

According to Ibn Qayyum (1350 AD), Rahmân describes the quality of abounding Grace which is inherent in and inseparable from the Almighty.

In Muhammad Ali's translation of the Qur'ân, he refers to classical sources (as indicated by the initials in parenthesis) who said:

Rahmân and Rahîm are both derived from the root rahmat, signifying tenderness requiring the exercise of beneficence [kindness] ®, and thus comprising the ideas of love and mercy.

Al-Rahmân and al-Rahîm are both active participle nouns of different measures denoting intensiveness of significance, the former being of the measure of fa'lân and indicating the greatest preponderance of the quality of mercy, and the later being of the measure of fa'îl and being expressive of a constant repetition and manifestation of the attribute (AH).

The Prophet is reported to have said: "Al-Rahmân is the beneficent One whose love and mercy are manifested in the creation of the world, and al-Rahîm is the merciful One whose love and mercy are manifested in the state that comes after" (AH), i.e as a consequence of the deeds of men. Thus the former is expressive of the utmost degree of love and generosity, the latter of unbounded and constant favor and mercy.

Lexicologists agree in holding that the former includes both the believer and the unbeliever for its objects, while the latter relates specifically to the believer (LL).

In the Dictionary of the Holy Qur'ân, Abdul Omar quotes from classical resources:

Rahmân is an active participle noun of the measure fa'lân which conveys the idea of fullness and extensiveness and indicates the greatest preponderance of the quality of love and mercy which comprehends the entire universe without regard to our effort or asking, even before we are born. The creation of the sun, the moon, air and water, etc are all there because of this attribute.... the term Rahmân circumscribes the quality of abounding Grace inherent in and inseparable from the Almighty.

Rahîm is in the measure of fa'îl and denotes the idea of constant repetition and giving of a liberal reward to those who deserve it and seek it. The Manifestation of this attribute is in response to and is a result of the action of the human being. That is, Rahîm indicates that which is extremely and continuously loving and merciful, and who is the dispenser of grace and love as a result of our deeds and supplications, and the One in whom the attribute is constantly and [endlessly] repeated.

Your God is One God; there is no God save him, THE BENEFICIENT, the Merciful.

(2:163)

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Bismilah

Asalamalaikum

Ar-Raheem THE MERCIFUL

Mercy is the patience and forgiveness that Allah holds for us and which flows from Him to all His creation, protecting them, preserving them, guiding them, and leading them to goodness. The Mercy of Allah is for everyone, while His justice and punishment are kept for those who turn away from the goodness. The benefits that we receive from others are because of Allah's mercy to them and us.

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2) ar-Rahîm

The Most Merciful, The Most Compassionate

The One who grants even more grace and greater rewards in response to our good actions and high thoughts.

The One who greatly rewards those who use the Divine bounties and beneficence in a good way.

The One who has mercy on the merciful.

From the root r-h-m which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to have tenderness, gentleness, kindness

to love

to have mercy, to have pity

to show favor and goodness

to have all that is required for beneficence

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 1:1

The root r-h-m also indicates womb; meaning that which provides protection and nourishment, and that from which all of creation is brought into being.

Rahmân conveys the idea of fullness and extensiveness, indicating the great quality of love and mercy which engulfs all of creation without any effort or request on our part, while Rahîm conveys the idea of constant renewal and giving liberal reward to those who are deserving.

Al-Rahmân is the Beneficent One whose endless outpouring of love and mercy are continually showered upon all of creation, while al-Rahîm is the Merciful One whose love and mercy are manifested as that which is received as the consequence of one's deeds.

According to Ibn Qayyum (1350 AD), Rahîm expresses the continuous manifestation of the Grace in our lives and its effect upon us as a result of our own activities.

In Muhammad Ali's translation of the Qur'ân, he refers to classical sources (as indicated by the initials in parenthesis) who said:

Rahmân and Rahîm are both derived from the root rahmat, signifying tenderness requiring the exercise of beneficence [kindness] ®, and thus comprising the ideas of love and mercy.

Al-Rahmân and al-Rahîm are both active participle nouns of different measures denoting intensiveness of significance, the former being of the measure of fa'lân and indicating the greatest preponderance of the quality of mercy, and the later being of the measure of fa'îl and being expressive of a constant repetition and manifestation of the attribute (AH).

The Prophet is reported to have said: "Al-Rahmân is the beneficent One whose love and mercy are manifested in the creation of the world, and al-Rahîm is the merciful One whose love and mercy are manifested in the state that comes after" (AH), i.e as a consequence of the deeds of men. Thus the former is expressive of the utmost degree of love and generosity, the latter of unbounded and constant favor and mercy.

Lexicologists agree in holding that the former includes both the believer and the unbeliever for its objects, while the latter relates specifically to the believer (LL).

In the Dictionary of the Holy Qur'ân, Abdul Omar quotes from classical resources:

Rahmân is an active participle noun of the measure fa'lân which conveys the idea of fullness and extensiveness and indicates the greatest preponderance of the quality of love and mercy which comprehends the entire universe without regard to our effort or asking, even before we are born. The creation of the sun, the moon, air and water, etc are all there because of this attribute.... the term Rahmân circumscribes the quality of abounding Grace inherent in and inseparable from the Almighty.

Rahîm is in the measure of fa'îl and denotes the idea of constant repetition and giving of a liberal reward to those who deserve it and seek it. The Manifestation of this attribute is in response to and is a result of the action of the human being. That is, Rahîm indicates that which is extremely and continuously loving and merciful, and who is the dispenser of grace and love as a result of our deeds and supplications, and the One in whom the attribute is constantly and [endlessly] repeated.

He it is who sent down clear revelations unto His Slave (Muhammad), that He may bring you forth from darkness unto light; and lo! for you, Allah is Full of Pity, MERCIFUL.

(57:9)

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3) Al-Malik

The Sovereign

~

Al-Malik means king, which is a name of Allah,

because Allah is the King of all kings.

Allah is the One and only Ruler of all worlds

and creations of this world and the Hereafter.

~

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3) al-Malik

The King, The Ruler

The One who is king of all beings. The One who is the owner and ruler of this world.

The One who has supreme authority, and who is relied upon by everyone.

The One who has all ruling power over all beings, and is ruled by none.

From the root m-l-k which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to possess, to own exclusively

to exercise authority to command

to have power over, command, reign

to have dominion over, to have ruling power

to have kingship

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:23

The name Malik signifies king, while the name the name Mâlik, by virtue of the â which intensifies the meaning, signifies something that is in some way greater than a king, and is often translated as master or lord. However, the exact differences between these names are not universally agreed upon.

By some traditions, al-Malik is considered to be the owner and king of this world, or of the beings of this world, while Mâlik al-Mulk is considered to be the supreme lord and master of all worlds, the known and the unknown, the manifest and the un-manifest.

Now Allah be Exalted THE TRUE KING! There is no God save Him, the Lord of the Throne of Grace.

(23:116)

4) Quddûs

The Most Holy, The Most Pure, The All-Perfect

The One who is pure, spotless, without blemish or fault.

The One who is far from, and untouched by, worldly imperfections or faults.

The One whose essence and attributes are of unimaginable purity and perfection.

The One who is beyond all human understanding of purity, perfection and holiness.

From the root q-d-s which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to be pure, clean, spotless

to be far removed from impurity or imperfection

to be holy, sacred, hallowed

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:23

The ancient roots of the Arabic word Quddûs, as well as the Hebrew word Kadosh, point toward that which is set apart, different, that which is 'other'. Thus, al-Quddûs is known as the One who is set apart, distinctly different and separate from all worldly imperfections, sins and faults, the One whose perfection and righteousness are so 'other' that they cannot be grasped by mankind, the truly Blessed One.

The name al-Quddûs describes the unique, unimaginable purity and perfection that is Allâh, the One whose goodness and righteousness are beyond our understanding.

According to al-Qurturbi, the name al-Quddûs also describes the One who is glorified and revered by the angels.

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines the word holy as:

Holy -- Exalted or worthy of complete devotion as one perfect in goodness and righteousness.

Whatever is in the heavens and on earth, doth declare the Praises and Glory of Allah; the Sovereign, THE HOLY ONE, the Exalted in Might, the Wise.

(62:1)

5) Salâm

The Source of Peace, The Flawless, The Source of Wholeness and Well-Being

The One who is perfect, whole, prosperous and content.

The One who is the source of all peace, wholeness and safety.

The One who has rendered all of creation to be perfect, whole, prosperous and content.

The One whose creation is free of imperfections, free of faults and free of error.

From the root s-l-m which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to be peaceful, quiet, tranquil, content, friendly, reconciled

to be free from imperfections, free from faults, complete, whole, sound

to be safe, secure, well, healthy, prosperous

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:23

This ancient Semitic root of s-l-m implies every manner of wholeness, completeness and prosperity.

Many seek peace by struggling, battling and trying to impose their will on others, yet external peace will only prevail as a reflection of inner peace. The only path to outer peace is awareness of the tranquil depths of inner peace, and the only source of such inner peace is the One known as as-Salâm.

According to Râghib the word Islam, which arises form this same s-l-m root, means to enter into salm... which means to enter into peace, or to enter into wholeness. That is, the word Islam means to be at peace with or reconciled with the ways and decrees of Allâh, and is often described as self-resignation, surrender or submission to the will of Allâh.

He is Allah, than whom there is no other God, the Sovereign Lord, The Holy One, PEACE, The Keeper Of Faith, the Guardian, the Majestic, the Compeller, the Superb. Glorified be Allah from all that they ascribe as partner (unto Him).

(59:23)

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6) al-Mu'min

The Remover of Fear, The Giver of Tranquility, The Source of Faith

The One who faithfully bestows the gifts of peace, safety and security.

The One who grants freedom from fear.

The One who illuminates the heart with faith. The One who is most trustworthy.

From the root â-m-n which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to be secure, safe, free from fear

to be quiet, tranquil

to grant protection, safeguard

to be trusted, trustworthy

to believe in

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:23

The word îmân, often simply translated simply as faith or belief, comes from this same â-m-n root, and could well be translated as has been granted peace and security.

The word âmîn, often translated simply as amen, also comes from this same â-m-n root, and could be translated as in this we trust or in this we are free from fear.

The root â-m-n root is also the original source of the name al-Muhaymin (the protector).

Related names:

Raqîb refers to the One who has the attribute of watchfulness.

Wakîl refers to the One who is the trusted administrator.

Hafîz refers to the One who protects and preserves.

Mâni' - the One who protects and defends against harmful situations.

Muhaymin refers to the One who is the ever-watchful guardian and protector.

Mu'min - The One who grants security and freedom from fear.

He is Allah, than whom there is no other God, the Sovereign Lord, The Holy One, Peace, THE KEEPER OF FAITH, the Guardian, the Majestic, the Compeller, the Superb. Glorified be Allah from all that they ascribe as partner (unto Him).

(59:23)

7) al-Muhaymin

The Protector, The Bestower of Security, The Guardian, The Safeguarder

The One who ensures well-being. The One who extends wings of Love to cover and protect creation.

The One who is ever watchful. The One who protects and guards.

The One who offers peace and security. The One who proclaims the Truth.

From the root h-y-m-n which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to watch over, oversee, protect, guard

to be a witness to

to offer security and peace

to determine what is true

to extend a wing (like a hen protecting her chicks)

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:23

According to E.W. Lane, the root of Muhaymin was originally â-m-n, the same root as al-Mu'min (remover of fear).

Related names:

Raqîb refers to the One who has the attribute of watchfulness.

Wakîl refers to the One who is the trusted administrator.

Hafîz refers to the One who protects and preserves.

Mâni' - the One who protects and defends against harmful situations.

Muhaymin refers to the One who is the ever-watchful guardian and protector.

Mu'min - The One who grants security and freedom from fear.

Also written as al-Muhaimin.

He is Allah, than whom there is no other God, the Sovereign Lord, the Holy One, Peace, The Keeper Of Faith, THE GUARDIAN, the Majestic, the Compeller, the Superb. Glorified be Allah from all that they ascribe as partner (unto Him).

(59:23)

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8) al-'Azîz

The Mighty, The Strong, Dignified and Powerful, The Eminent

The One who is the most Powerful and most Cherished. The victorious One whose strength, glory and power are overwhelming and cannot be overcome or resisted.

The One whose dignity, majesty and power are unique, precious and unattainable by mankind. The One whose respectability and nobility are above all others. The One who is the ultimate in honor and nobility.

The One who has complete mastery over all of creation. The One who overcomes everything. The One who is incomparable and unparalleled. The One who is the cherished source of all strength, power and potency.

From the root '-z-z which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to be mighty, potent, strong, powerful

to be high, elevated, noble, exalted

to be honorable, noble, glorious, illustrious

to be indomitable, invincible

to be respected, cherished, dear

to be scarce, rare, precious, unattainable

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:23

Also written as 'Azîzun.

Blessed is He in Whose hand is the kingdom, and He has power over all things, Who created death and life that He may try you which of you is best in deeds; and He is THE MIGHTY, the Forgiving, Who created the seven heavens one above another; you see no incongruity in the creation of the Beneficent Allah; then look again, can you see any disorder?

(67:1-3)

9) al-Jabbâr

The Restorer, The Repairer, The All-Compelling, The Irresistible

The One who irresistibly restores all of creation to soundness and sufficiency.

The One who repairs, reforms and completes. The One who irresistibly compels things to be set aright.

The One who compels each and every thing according to divine will, yet is never compelled.

The One who is high, above all creation and utterly irresistible.

From the root j-b-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to restore something to sound, right or good state

to bring back to normal, reform

to benefit, to confer a benefit

to be supreme, high, above all of creation

to be compelling, irresistible

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:23

The essence of the root j-b-r is the irresistible restoration of something, and the name al-Jabbâr describes the nature of the One who is the ultimate restorer of the soundness, wholeness and righteousness of all things. For a human being, any claim to such irresistible power would be false pride and arrogance, but for Allâh it is simply the truth.

He is Allah, than whom there is no other God, the Sovereign Lord, The Holy One, Peace, the Keeper of Faith, the Guardian, the Majestic, THE COMPELLER, the Superb. Glorified be Allah from all that they ascribe as partner (unto Him).

(59:23)

10) al-Mutakabbir

The Supremely Great, The Possessor of all Rights, The Perfection of Greatness

The One who is supremely great. The One who is greater than all of creation.

The One who manifests greatness in all things and in all ways.

The One who has rights, privileges and attributes which others have not.

From the root k-b-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to be great in size, rank or dignity

to be great in size, to be vast, formidable

to be great in age, oldest

to be great in dignity, noble, majestic

to be great in learning, most knowing

to have rights above all others

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:23

Mutakabbir is an empathic form of the root k-b-r which denotes actively using rights, privileges and attributes that are above and beyond the rights of everyone else. In mankind, this would be called pride or arrogance, but for the One this is simply the truth.

Al-Qurtubi reported that this name was understood to mean Grand, Great One.

Related names:

Jalîl is considered to be greatness in attributes.

Kabîr denotes the One whose essence is greatness.

Azîm is greatness in both attributes and self.

Mutakabbir is an empathic form which denotes actively using rights, privileges, rank and attributes that are above and beyond the rights of everyone else.

He is Allah, than whom there is no other God, the Sovereign Lord, the Holy One, Peace, The Keeper Of Faith, the Guardian, the Majestic, the Compeller, THE SUPERB. Glorified be Allah from all that they ascribe as partner (unto Him).

(59:23)

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11 Al-Khaaliq

The Creator

~

Al-Khaaliq comes from the word Khalaq which means to create. Allah is the One Who has created the heavens and the earth, Who has created night and day, life and death.

~

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11) al-Khâliq

The Creator, The Planner

The One who determines and creates according to the proper measure and proportion of each thing. The One who plans and determines how, when and where to create.

The One whose works are perfectly suited, appropriate, fitting and proper. The One who creates something from nothing. The One who creates both the inner and the outer in just proportions.

The One who brings things into existence from a state of non-existence. The One who has the power to change things back and forth between the states of existing and non-existing.

From the root kh-l-q which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to measure accurately

to determine the proper measure or proportion for something

to proportion one thing according to another

to create something based on a pattern or model which one has devised

to bring a thing into existence from non-existence

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:24

Related names:

Bâri' denotes the way the One works with substances, often creating from existing matter, making and evolving that which is free and clear of any other thing, free and clear of imperfections.

Badî' denotes the One who creates in wonderful, amazingly original ways that have no precedent whatsoever, ways that are awesome innovation.

Khâliq denotes the One who continues to plan, measure out and create, and who has the power to change things from non-existing to existing.

Musawwir denotes the One who arranges forms and colors, and who is the shaper of beauty.

Mubdi' denotes the One who starts or begins all things, or that which has precedence given to it.

Also expressed as al-Khallâq (great creator).

The Originator of the heavens and the earth! How can He have a child, when there is for Him no consort, when He created all things and is Aware of all things? Such is Allah, your Lord. There is no god save Him, THE CREATOR of all things, so worship Him. And He taketh care of all things. Vision comprehends Him not, and He comprehends (all) vision. He is the Subtile, the Aware.

(6:101,102,103)

The similitude of Jesus before Allah is as that of Adam; HE CREATED HIM from dust, then said to him "Be !": and he was.

(3:59)

12) al-Bâri'

The Maker, The Producer, The Evolver, The Maker from Nothing

The One who creates form out of nothing. The One who creates with no model or similarity.

The One who evolves and re-creates that which exists, both physically and spiritually.

The One who sends new forms into existence.

The One who manifests that which is in perfect harmony and proportion, without blemish or fault.

From the root b-r-' which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to create, to form out of nothing, to manifest

to create using pre-existing matter, evolve

to be individual, free and clear of another thing

to be free and clear of fault or blemish

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:24

The Qur'ân commentary of al-Baydâwi says that the primary meaning of the root b-r-' is to denote a thing's becoming free and clear of another thing, either by by being released or by being created.

The ancient Semitic roots point toward a manifestation or emanation which is the fruition of a great power, and which contains the potentiality of that which brought it into being.

Related names:

Bâri' denotes the way the One works with substances, often creating from existing matter, making and evolving that which is free and clear of any other thing, free and clear of imperfections.

Badî' denotes the One who creates in wonderful, amazingly original ways that have no precedent whatsoever, ways that are awesome innovation.

Khâliq denotes the One who continues to plan, measure out and create, and who has the power to change things from non-existing to existing.

Musawwir denotes the One who arranges forms and colors, and who is the shaper of beauty.

Mubdi' denotes the One who starts or begins all things, or that which has precedence given to it.

And remember Moses said to his people: O my people! Ye have indeed wronged yourselves by your worship of the calf: So turn (in repentance) to your MAKER, and slay yourselves (the wrong-doers); that will be better for you in the sight of your MAKER. Then He turned towards you (in forgiveness): For He is Oft-Returning, Most Merciful.

(2:54)

13) al-Musawwir

The Fashioner, The Bestower of Forms, The Shaper

The One who is the fashioner and former of each and every thing in all of creation.

The One who has given everything in creation a special inclination or desire.

The One who has given everything a special form and a special manner whereby it is distinguished.

From the root s-w-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to make something incline, lean or bend towards

to form, fashion, sculpt, imagine or picture something

to have an inclination or desire towards something

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:24

Related names:

Bâri' denotes the way the One works with substances, often creating from existing matter, making and evolving that which is free and clear of any other thing, free and clear of imperfections.

Badî' denotes the One who creates in wonderful, amazingly original ways that have no precedent whatsoever, ways that are awesome innovation.

Khâliq denotes the One who continues to plan, measure out and create and who has the power to change things from one state to another.

Musawwir denotes the One who arranges forms and colors, and who is the shaper of beauty.

Mubdi' denotes the One who starts or begins all things, or that which has precedence given to it.

Also written as Musauwir.

Allah... Surely nothing is hidden from Him in the earth or in the heaven. He it is WHO SHAPES you in the wombs as He likes; there is no god but He, the Mighty, the Wise.

(3:5,6)

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Al-Ghaffaar

The Great Forgiver

~

Allah is the Great Forgiver because He covers or hides the sins of His servants. Allah forgives those who seek his pardon.

~

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15 Al-Qahhaar

The Dominant

~

It is only Allah that has complete command over all that happens in the universe. He is the absolute Dominant One Who is Greater than any king or leader in this world.

~

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14) al-Ghaffâr

The All-Forgiving, The Absolver, The Veiler of Sins and Faults, The Most Protecting One

The One who accepts repentance and veils or forgives our faults and sins, time and time again. The One who sets us free from the guilt and shame of our own sins and faults, such that we may discover inner harmony and peace.

The One who protects us from the effects of our faults and sins, both in the present world and the future. The One who accepts repentance and sets aright our faults and sins.

The One who veils, forgives or transforms our faults and sins in such a manner that we may go on without guilt or shame. The One who can set aright, or transform, wrong deeds and change them into what become good deeds.

From the root gh-f-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to cover, veil, conceal, hide

to pardon, to forgive, to set aright

to cover a thing to protect it from dirt

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 40:3

Abû Hâmid al-Ghazâlî said:

Every creature is bound to have perfection and imperfection, or ugliness and beauty, so whoever overlooks the ugly and mentions only the beautiful is one who shares in this attribute.

Note that the root gh-f-r has given rise to three Beautiful Names that are all used in the Qur'ân: Ghaffâr, Ghafûr and Ghâfir. However, only Ghaffâr and Ghafûr were included in the list of 99 Names narrated by Tirmidhi.

In Qastalânî's commentary on Bukhârî, it is said that the root gh-f-r means a covering or protection which is either between man and the commission of sin [protecting, or watching over], or between sin and the effects of that sin [forgiving, veiling or concealing].

In al-Nihâyah (a dictionary of hadîth), it is said that Ghâfir refers to the One who protects us from the commission of sins, and that Ghafûr refers to the One who forgives our sins and faults.

Sheikh Tosun Bayrak portrays the differences as:

... al-Ghâfir, the veiler of our faults from the eyes of other men; al-Ghafûr, who keeps the knowledge of our faults even from the angels; and al-Ghaffâr who relieves us from the suffering of continual remembrance of our faults.

The Arabic word astaghfirullâh (sometimes written as astghfrallâh or estaferallah) is from this same gh-f-r root, and is an invocation of Divine Protection having a range of possible connotations that include Allâh please forgive me, Allâh please hide away my faults, Allâh please watch over me and protect me from faults.

In the lexicon and commentary Tâj al-'Arûs it is mentioned that truly asking for forgiveness must be by both word and deed, not by the tongue alone.

The names Ghafûr, Ghaffâr and Ghâfir denote forgiving or protecting, while 'Afûw indicates complete removal or obliteration of the condition.

If Allah had willed to choose a son, He could have chosen what He would of that which He had created. Be He Glorified! He is Allah, the One, the Absolute. He has created the heavens and the earth with the truth; He makes the night cover the day and makes the day overtake the night, and He has made the sun and the moon subservient; each one runs on to an assigned term; now surely He is the Mighty, the GREAT FORGIVER.

(39:4,5)

15) al-Qahhâr

The Ever-Dominating, The Conqueror, The Prevailer

The One who prevails over all of creation. The One who overcomes all obstacles.

The One who is victorious over any opposition. The One whose will is irresistible.

The One who is dominant. The Ever-Dominating One.

The One who is master of all. The One to whom all submit.

From the root q-h-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to overcome, conquer

to overpower, master

to dominate over, prevail

to subdue, subjugate,

to compel against one's wishes

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 39:4

The names Qahhâr (ever-dominating, overpowering) and Latîf (subtle, refined) are sometimes used together to honor and appreciate the opposing, yet complementary, ways of the One.

Related names:

Qawî - Strong - the One who is all-mighty and possesses inexhaustible strength.

Matîn - Firm - the One whose nature it is to be firm, determined and steadfast.

Qahhâr - Dominator - the One who dominates, conquers, overpowers

Muqtadir - Determiner - the One who uses supreme power to enforce whatever Divine wisdom decrees or decides.

Say: Who is the Lord of the heavens and the earth?-- Say: Allah. Say: Do you take then besides Him guardians who do not control any profit or harm for themselves? Say: Are the blind and the seeing alike? Or can the darkness and the light be equal? Or have they set up with Allah associates who have created creation like His, so that what is created became confused to them? Say: Allah is the Creator of all things, and He is the One, the Supreme. (13:16)

16) al-Wahhab

The Most Liberal Bestower, The Great Giver, The Giver of Gifts

The One who continually bestows gifts, favors and blessings upon all of creation.

The One who is the most generous and liberal giver.

The One who gives freely and endlessly, without expectation of any return.

From the root w-h-b which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to give for no compensation, to give as a gift

to donate, to offer as a present, bestow

to give liberally and freely

to grant, endow

to cause something to be

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 3:8

With regard to mankind's role in giving, Abû Hâmid al-Ghazâlî notes that:

... whoever bestows gifts with an eye to some interest to be realized by it sooner or later, be it appreciation, affection or release from blame, or or acquiring distinction of mention - he is neither a giver nor generous, but rather engaged in transaction and recompense.... But the one who sacrifices all he owns, even his life, for the sake of God alone - such a one is worthy of being named giver and generous.

Our Lord! Cause not our hearts to stray after Thou hast guided us, and bestow upon us mercy from Thy Presence. Lo! Thou, only Thou, art THE BESTOWER. Our Lord! Lo! it is Thou Who gatherest mankind together to a Day of which there is no doubt. Lo! Allah faileth not to keep the tryst. (On that Day) neither the riches nor the progeny of those who disbelieve will aught avail them with Allah. They will be fuel for Fire.

(3:8-10)

17) ar-Razzâq

The Provider, The Providence, The Supplier, The Bestower of Sustenance

The One who creates all means of nourishment and subsistence. The One who is the giver of all things beneficial, both physical and spiritual. The One who provides everything that is needed.

The One who causes the means of subsistence to come. The One who bestows all means of support and growth, for the body, the mind and the spiritual life.

From the root r-z-q which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to receive something beneficial, especially as a gift

to be provided with the necessities of life

to receive a portion, share or lot

to be supplied with a means of subsistence

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 51:58

The root r-z-k points to the idea of the receiving of anything beneficial, particularly a gift, whereby something is nourished, sustained, or helped to grow physically, mentally or spiritually.

Allah is He Who created the heavens and the earth, and causeth water to descend from the sky, THEREBY PRODUCING FRUITS AS FOOD FOR YOU, and maketh the ships to be of service unto you, that they may run upon the sea at His command, and hath made of service unto you the rivers; And maketh the sun and the moon, constant in their courses, to be of service unto you, and hath made of service unto you the night and the day. And He giveth you of all ye ask of Him, and if ye would count the bounty of Allah ye cannot reckon it. Lo! man is verily a wrong-doer, an ingrate.

(14:32-34)

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18 Al-Fattaah (34:26)

The Judge

~

Allah is the Absolute and Final Judge.

It is Allah that knows what is in our hearts and

He will show the truth of our actions.

~

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18) al-Fattâh

The Opener, The Revealer, The Granter of Success

The One who is the judge and revealer. The One who opens what is closed. The One who is the judge of what shall be opened.

The One by whose guidance that which was closed is opened and the unclear is made clear. The One who lifts veils and who opens the heart.

The One who unties the knots, and softens that which was hardened. The One who continually offers goodness and mercy.

The One who gives victory. The One who opens the door to success. The One who holds the keys to victory and success. The One who reveals the solution to all problems.

From the root f-t-h which has the following classical Arabic connotations

to open, unlock, unfold

to make victorious

to reveal, inform, explain, make clear

to judge, decide

to grant, permit

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 34:26

The name of first chapter of the Qur'ân, al-Fâtiha, is based on this same root, and is generally translated as The Opener, or The Opening.

The Arabic word miftâhî, translated as key, meaning that which opens or unlocks, is also based on this same root.

Say: Our Lord will gather us together, then will He judge between us with the truth; and He is THE GREATEST JUDGE, the All-knowing.

(34:26)

...And whosoever keepeth his duty to Allah, ALLAH WILL APPOINT A WAY OUT FOR HIM. And will provide for him from (a quarter) whence he hath no expectation. And whosoever putteth his trust in Allah, He will suffice him. Lo! Allah bringeth His command to pass. Allah hath set a measure for all things.

(65:2,3)

19) al-'Alîm

The All-Knowing, The Omniscient, The Certain-Knowing

The One who comprehends everything. The One who is intuitively aware of all things, even before they happen.

The One who knows with certainty. The One whose knowledge of past, present and future is deeply rooted and complete in all respects.

One from whom no knowledge is concealed. The One who is aware of the complete details of all matters. The Omniscient One.

From the root 'a-l-m which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to have knowledge, be cognizant, be certain

to be aware, thoroughly informed

to be find out, gather information

to have intuitive knowledge

to have firmly rooted knowledge of the minute particulars

to act according to knowledge

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 2:32

Related names:

'Alîm denotes knowing with certainty, especially intuitive knowing, omniscience.

Khabîr denotes an understanding of the inner qualities, secrets and true reality.

Lo! Allah! With Him is knowledge of the Hour. He sendeth down the rain, and knoweth that which is in the wombs. No soul knoweth what it will earn to-morrow, and no soul knoweth in what land it will die. Lo! Allah is KNOWER, Aware.

(31:34)

And with Him are the keys of the Invisible. None but He knoweth them. And HE KNOWETH WHAT IS IN THE LAND AND THE SEA. NOT A LEAF FALLETH BUT HE KNOWETH IT, not a grain amid the darkness of the earth, naught of wet or dry but (it is noted) in a clear record.

(6:59)

20) al-Qâbid

The Withholder, The Restrainer, The Constrictor

The One whose wisdom causes withholding, either physically or spiritually. The One whose wisdom decides when to withhold something, or make something scarce.

The One whose wisdom may elect to withhold joy and expansion of the heart.

The One in whose hand all hearts are held. The One whose hand collects all souls at the time of death.

From the root q-b-d which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to take in the hand, clutch, lay hold of

to grasp, grip, seize, hold firmly

to have absolute ownership of something (hold in the hand)

to give and take (hand over and take in hand), barter

to contract, shrink, draw together, collect together

to draw in (as a bird contracting a wing)

to withhold, make scanty, make scarce

to contract the heart, i.e. distress, depression, lack of joy

The name Qâbid is not specifically used as a Beautiful Name in the Qur'ân.

The underlying roots of Qâbid give a sense of give and take, a movement back and forth, an underlying rhythm of ebb and flow, like the rhythmical folding and unfolding of a bird's wings in flight, or the rising and setting of the sun, or the endless cycles of life and death.

Qâbid (constrictor) and Bâsit (expander) are opposites.

The Arabic lexicon and commentary Tâj al-'Arûs, as interpreted by E.W. Lane, says:

Qabd [Qâbid] and Bast [bâsit] are terms applied by the investigators of truth among the Sûfîs to the two contrary states of the heart, from both of which it is seldom or never free: the former being an affection of the heart withholding it from dilation and joy; whether the cause thereof be known, as the remembrance of a sin or an offence, or of an omission, or be not known...

Who is he that will loan to Allah a beautiful loan, which Allah will double unto his credit and multiply many times? It is Allah that GIVES (you) WANT or plenty, and to Him shall be your return.

(2:245)

21) al-Bâsit

The Unfolder, The Expander, The Releaser

The One who makes ample and plentiful all that is needed. The One who expands and amplifies all abundance.

The One who makes the way wide and open. The One who stretches out a helping hand to mankind. The One whose open hand releases joy, comfort and abundance.

The One who infuses the soul into body. The One who has filled the heart with spiritual abundance. The One whose glory and abundance fill and expand the heart.

From the root b-s-t which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to expand, enlarge, extend

to grant abundance, to provide amply

to spread, widen, to make spacious

to extend a hand

The term Bâsit is not specifically used as a Beautiful Name in the Qur'ân.

The term Bâsit includes a powerful and majestic sense of infusing into something a gift which will grow and flourish in great abundance.

Qâbid (constrictor) and Bâsit (expander) are opposites.

The Arabic lexicon and commentary Tâj al-'Arûs, as interpreted by E.W. Lane, says:

Qabd [Qâbid] and Bast [bâsit] are terms applied by the investigators of truth among the Sûfîs to the two contrary states of the heart, from both of which it is seldom or never free: the former being an affection of the heart withholding it from dilation and joy; whether the cause thereof be known, as the remembrance of a sin or an offence, or of an omission, or be not known...

... Make not thy hand tied (like a niggard's) to thy neck, nor stretch it forth to its utmost reach, so that thou become blameworthy and destitute. Verily thy Lord doth PROVIDE SUSTENANCE IN ABUNDANCE for whom He pleaseth, and He provideth in a just measure: for He doth know and regard all His servants. Kill not your children for fear of want: We shall provide sustenance for them as well as for you verily the killing of them is a great sin. Nor come nigh to adultery: for it is a shameful (deed) and an evil, opening the road (to other evils) ...

(17:29...32)

22) al-Khâfid

The Humbler, The One who Softens, The Lowerer

The One who chooses the ones to be humbled, softened, made gentle.

The One who decides which ones to weaken or diminish.

The One who humbles the proud, haughty or insolent, to awaken them from their sleep.

From the root kh-f-d which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to lower, weaken, depress

to make humble, abase

to relax, diminish, subdue

to make gentle, tranquil, easy to deal with

to soften, make easy, facilitate

The name Khâfid is not specifically used as a Beautiful Name in the Qur'ân.

Râfi' (uplifter) is the opposite of Khâfid (humbler).

The names Khâfid and Râfi' are often used together to acknowledge the way that balance and harmony are established and maintained though the interplay of cause and effect.

Mudhill (dishonorer) is similar to, but much more intensive and unpleasant than, Khâfid (humbler).

The phrase al Khâfid ur Râfi' is recited in the audio sample.

Lo! those who oppose Allah and His messenger WILL BE ABASED EVEN AS THOSE BEFORE THEM WERE ABASED; and We have sent down clear tokens, and for disbelievers is a shameful doom

(58:5)

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23) ar-Râfi'

The Uplifter, The Exalter

The One whose wisdom chooses the ones to be uplifted.

The One who uplifts and elevates mankind above petty desires and selfishness.

The One who makes it possible to rise above the differences and distinctions that divide mankind.

From the root r-f-' which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to raise or elevate something

to uplift, to take it up

to make high, lofty

to exalt, make honorable, make eminent

to bring a thing near

The name Râfi' is not specifically used as a Beautiful Name in the Qur'ân.

Râfi' (uplifter) is the opposite of Khâfid (humbler).

The names Khâfid and Râfi' are often used together to acknowledge the way that balance and harmony are established and maintained though the interplay of cause and effect.

Mu'izz (honorer) is similar to, but much more more intensive and glorious than, Râfi' (uplifter).

He it is Who hath placed you as viceroys of the earth and hath EXALTED SOME OF YOU IN RANK ABOVE OTHERS, that He may try you by (the test of) that which He hath given you. Lo! Thy Lord is swift in prosecution, and Lo! He verily is Forgiving, Merciful.

(6:165)

24) al-Mu'izz

The Honorer, The Strengthener, The Glorifier

The One who gives invincible strength and honor.

The One who grants honor and power. The One who strengthens and glorifies.

The One who makes it possible for someone or something to be respected, cherished and mighty.

From the root '-z-z which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to be mighty, potent, strong, powerful

to be high, elevated, noble, exalted

to be honorable, noble, glorious, illustrious

to be indomitable, invincible

to be respected, cherished, dear

to be scarce, rare, precious, unattainable

The name Mu'izz is not specifically used as a Beautiful Name in the Qur'ân.

The name al-'Azîz (mighty) is also from this same '-z-z root.

Mu'izz (honorer) is the opposite of Mudhill (dishonorer).

Mu'izz (honorer) is similar to, but much more more intensive and glorious than, Râfi' (uplifter).

Say: "O Allah! Lord of Power (and Rule), Thou givest Power to whom Thou pleasest, and Thou strippest off Power from whom Thou pleasest: Thou ENDUEST WITH HONOUR whom Thou pleasest, and Thou bringest low whom Thou pleasest: in Thy hand is all Good. Verily, over all things Thou hast power.

(3:26)

25) al-Mudhill

The Dishonorer, The Disgracer, The Degrader, The Humiliator

The One whose wisdom creates situations that are low and despicable.

The One who creates the appearance of dishonor or degradation.

The One whose wisdom produces circumstances of humiliation and disgrace.

From the root dh-l-l which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to be low, base, abject, paltry

to be vile, contemptible, despicable

to be inglorious, abased, humble

to be lowly, submissive, weak

to be tractable, easy, manageable

The name Mudhill is not specifically used as a Beautiful Name in the Qur'ân.

According to Classical Arabic definitions, Mudhill is an intensive epithet which denotes exceeding lowness or baseness.

Mudhill (dishonorer) is the opposite of Mu'izz (honorer).

Mudhill (dishonorer) is similar to, but much more intensive and unpleasant than, Khâfid (humbler).

Sometimes written as al-Mudill.

Say: "O Allah! Lord of Power (and Rule), Thou givest Power to whom Thou pleasest, and Thou strippest off Power from whom Thou pleasest: Thou enduest with honour whom Thou pleasest, and Thou BRINGEST LOW whom Thou pleasest: in Thy hand is all Good. Verily, over all things Thou hast power.

(3:26)

26) as-Samî'

The All-Hearing, The Ever-Listening

The One whose hearing and attention comprehends everything. The One who pays attention to every supplication and invocation.

The One who listens to every voice. The One who hears and accepts every word, thought and secret.

The One who listens to everything, perfectly, eternally, without limitations.

From the root s-m-' which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to hear, to listen

to accept, to receive, to be told

to pay attention to, pay regard to

to understand the meaning

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 17:1

Imam al-Ghazâlî has said that in order to explore the depths of an attribute of Allah, one must venture far beyond the human expression of such a quality:

When you elevate the All-Hearing above changes which happen to Him when audible sounds occur, and exalt Him above hearing by ears, you will realize that His hearing is an attribute by which the perfection of the qualities of things heard is disclosed. Whoever does not not take care in considering this matter will inevitably fall into mere anthropomorphism. So, be wary, and be precise when you consider it.

The word samâ' (often written sema in Turkish), which literally means hearing or paying attention to, is commonly used to describe the musical gatherings of the Sufis, especially the great whirling dance of the dervishes.

(He is) The Creator of the heavens and the earth. He hath made for you pairs of yourselves, and of the cattle also pairs, whereby He multiplieth you. Naught is as His likeness; and He is THE HEARER, the Seer.

(42:11)

27) al-Basîr

The All-Seeing, The All-Perceiving, The All-Comprehending

The One whose insight sees all things clearly, both the apparent and the hidden. The One who sees and understands all that has been, and all that will be.

The One who has insight into all things. The One who perceives every detail. The One who understands all things, both outer and inner.

The One who has given to mankind the outer eye of the body, and the inner eye of the heart.

From the root b-s-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to see, behold, notice

to understand, to know

to perceive, to have insight

to be acutely aware

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 17:1

Establish worship, and pay the poor-due; and whatever of good ye send before (you) for your souls, ye will find it with Allah. Lo! ALLAH IS SEER OF WHAT YE DO.

(2:110)

So tread thou the straight path as thou art commanded, and those who turn (unto Allah) with thee, and transgress not. Lo! HE IS SEER OF WHAT YE DO.

(11:112)

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28

Al-Hakam

The Arbitrator

~

He is the Ruler and His judgment is His Word. He is The One who orders. He is the bringer of justice and truth. He judges. And executes His justice.

~

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28) al-Hakam

The Judge, The Giver of Justice, The Arbitrator

The One who is the supreme arbitrating magistrate. The One who is the only true judge.

The One who always delivers justice in every situation. The One whose judgments and decrees are never over-turned or thwarted.

The One who makes the final decision of the nature of all matters. The One who arbitrates all disputes.

From the root h-k-m which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to be wise, knowing the true nature of things

to pass judgment, to decide, pass a verdict

to judge and pass sentence

to prevent or restrain from wrongdoing or corruption

to turn someone back from wrongdoing or ignorance

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 6:114

The words hakam and hakîm both arise from the same h-k-m root, but hakam is a verbal noun which emphasizes the delivery of justice, while hakîm is a noun which indicates the essential nature of the possessor of wisdom.

ALLAH WILL JUDGE BETWEEN YOU on the Day of Judgment concerning the matters in which ye differ.

(22:69)

And call not, besides Allah, an another god. There is no god but He. Everything (that exists) will perish except His own Face. TO HIM BELONGS THE COMMAND, and to Him will ye (all) be brought back.

(28:88)

29) al-'Adl

The Equitable, The Impartial, The Just

The One who rectifies and sets matters straight in a fair, impartial and equitable manner.

The One who always acts justly. The One who delivers absolute justice.

The One whose wisdom of justice is based upon complete knowledge of past, present and future.

From the root 'a-d-l which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to act justly, fairly

to be equitable, impartial

to adjust properly, to make even

to straighten, to rectify, to establish justice

to balance, counterbalance, to make equal, uniform

to turn one away from something, rightly direct

to make comfortable with what is right

The term 'Adl is not specifically used as a Beautiful Name in the Qur'ân.

Although a situation may seem unfair to us due to our limited understanding, the Supreme Justice is absolute and unerring in fairness and equality.

The word of thy Lord DOTH FIND ITS FULFILMENT IN TRUTH AND IN JUSTICE: none can change His Words for He is the One Who heareth and knoweth all.

(6:115)

30) al-Latîf

The Most Subtle, The Gracious, The Refined and Benevolent

The One who is most subtle and gracious. The One whose nature is gentle, affectionate, courteous and refined.

The One who is kind, gracious, and understanding, with regard for the subtle details of individual circumstances.

The One whose actions are so fine and subtle that they may be imperceptible, beyond our comprehension.

The One whose delicate perception reveals the subtleties of all things.

From the root l-t-f which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to be thin, delicate, refined, elegant, graceful

to be gentle, gracious, courteous, kindly

to be subtle, to know the obscurities of all affairs

to treat with regard for circumstances

to be most soothing and refined in manner

to treat with kindness, goodness, gentleness, benevolence, affection

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 67:14

The names Qahhâr (ever-dominating, overpowering) and Latîf (subtle, refined) are sometimes used together to honor and appreciate the opposing, yet complementary, ways of the One

That is Allah, your Lord! There is no god but He, the Creator of all things; then worship ye Him; and He hath power to dispose of all affairs. No vision can grasp Him. But His grasp is over all vision: HE IS ABOVE ALL COMPREHENSION, yet is acquainted with all things. "How have come to you, from your Lord, proofs (to open your eyes): if any will see, it will be for (the good of) his own soul; if any will be blind, it will be to his own (harm): I am not (here) to watch over your doings."

(6:102...104)

31) al-Khabîr

The Inner-Knowing, The Knower of Reality, The Knower of Inner Truth

The One who knows the internal qualities and meanings of all things. The One who has perfect knowledge and understanding of the true reality of all things.

The One who knows and understands the meaning of even the most hidden secrets. The One who know the inner truth of every condition and situation.

The One who knows and understands secret requests and unspoken prayers. The One who knows and understands the real condition, the inner reality, of everything.

From the root kh-b-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to know, or be aware of the real inner nature of something

to have understanding of the inner, intrinsic nature of something

to know the reality of something

to know the secret inner state of something

to prove, try, test by experience (resulting in inner knowledge)

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 22:63

Related names:

'Alîm denotes knowing with certainty, especially intuitive knowing, omniscience.

Khabîr denotes an understanding of the inner qualities, secrets and true reality.

O mankind! We created you from a single (pair) of a male and a female, and made you into nations and tribes, that ye may know each other (not that ye may despise each other). Verily the most honoured of you in the sight of Allah is (he who is) the most righteous of you. And Allah has full Knowledge and IS WELL-ACQUAINTED (WITH ALL THINGS).

(49:13)

O ye who believe! Fear Allah, and let every soul look to what (provision) he has sent forth for the morrow. Yea, fear Allah: for ALLAH IS WELL-ACQUAINTED WITH (ALL) THAT YE DO. And be ye not like those who forgot Allah, and He made them forget their own souls! Such are the rebellious transgressors!

(59:18-19)

32) al-Halîm

The Most Serene, The Most Kind and Gentle, The Calm Abiding

The One who is kind, gracious and serene in all situations.

The One who is calm and deliberate, never hasty, even with the rebellious and wrongdoers.

The One whose manner is lenient and mild.

The One who gives us the opportunity and situations to learn to be kind, gracious and patient.

From the root h-l-m which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to be forbearing, mild, lenient, clement

to be forgiving, gentle, deliberate

to be leisurely in manner, not hasty

to be calm, serene

to manage one's temper

to exhibit moderation

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 22:59

Related names:

Halîm is the patience that arises from a sense of deep serenity, lenience, calm deliberation.

Sabûr is the patience that arises by self-restraint, enduring something without complaint.

The seven heavens and the earth, and all beings therein, declare His glory: there is not a thing but celebrates His praise; and yet ye understand not how they declare His glory! verily HE IS OFT-FORBEARING, Most Forgiving!

(17:44)

It is Allah Who sustains the heavens and the earth, lest they cease (to function): and if they should fail, there is none - not one - can sustain them thereafter: VERILY HE IS MOST FORBEARING, Oft-Forgiving.

(35:41)

33) al-'Azîm

The Supreme Glory, The Mighty Splendor, The Most Grand, The Greatest

The One who is greatest, mightiest, grandest and above all.

The One who is of the greatest importance.

The One who is magnificent, vast and most revered.

The One who is of perfect and absolute greatness.

From the root 'a-z-m which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to be great, large, big

to be vast, huge, enormous

to be great in rank, importance or dignity

to be imposing, powerful, superior

to be magnificent, honored, revered, sublime

to be immense, stupendous, lofty

to be above imperfection

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 2:255

Note that the letter z sounds nothing at all like the English letter z, but rather is a open-jaw "th" sound.

Related names:

Jalîl is considered to be greatness in attributes.

Kabîr denotes the One whose essence is greatness.

Azîm is greatness in both attributes and self.

Mutakabbir is an empathic form which denotes actively using rights, privileges, rank and attributes that are above and beyond the rights of everyone else.

Also written as 'Azhim or 'Athim.

Allah! There is no god but He, the Living, the Self-subsisting, Eternal. No slumber can seize Him nor sleep. His are all things in the heavens and on earth. Who is there can intercede in His presence except as He permitteth? He knoweth what (appeareth to His creatures as) Before or After or Behind them. Nor shall they compass aught of His knowledge except as He willeth. His Throne doth extend over the heavens and the earth, and He feeleth no fatigue in guarding and preserving them for He is the Most High, THE SUPREME (in glory).

(2:255)

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34 Al-Ghafoor

The All Forgiving

~

Allah forgives the sins of those who sincerely ask for His Forgiveness.

Although Allah is All-Forgiving we should not live sinful lives

but rather be ashamed of our sins and avoid repeating them.

When forgiven He can make us forget those sins.

Nothing can stop His blessings to flow freely when we are worthy.

~

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34) al-Ghafûr

The Forgiving, The Forgiver of Sins and Faults, The Perfectly Forgiving, The Pardoner

The One who completely forgives our sins and faults. The One who accepts repentance and pardons sins and faults.

The One who veils or forgives our faults and sins such that they are not seen by anyone else, not even the angels.

The One who is the perfection of forgiveness. The One whose forgiving demonstrates excellence, completeness and perfection of forgiveness.

From the root gh-f-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to cover, veil, conceal, hide

to pardon, to forgive, to set aright

to cover a thing to protect it from dirt

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 40:3

Note that the root gh-f-r has given rise to three Beautiful Names that are all used in the Qur'ân: Ghaffâr, Ghafûr and Ghâfir. However, only Ghaffâr and Ghafûr were included in the list of 99 Names narrated by Tirmidhi.

In Qastalânî's commentary on Bukhârî, it is said that the root gh-f-r means a covering or protection which is either between man and the commission of sin [protecting, or watching over], or between sin and the effects of that sin [forgiving, veiling or concealing].

In al-Nihâyah (a dictionary of hadîth), it is said that Ghâfir refers to the One who protects us from the commission of sins, and that Ghafûr refers to the One who forgives our sins and faults.

Sheikh Tosun Bayrak portrays the differences as:

... al-Ghâfir, the veiler of our faults from the eyes of other men; al-Ghafûr, who keeps the knowledge of our faults even from the angels; and al-Ghaffâr who relieves us from the suffering of continual remembrance of our faults.

The Arabic word astaghfirullâh (sometimes written as astghfrallâh, estagfurullâh or estaferallâh) is from this same gh-f-r root, and is an invocation of Divine Protection having a range of possible connotations that include Allâh please forgive me, Allâh please hide away my faults, Allâh please watch over me and protect me from faults.

In the lexicon and commentary Tâj al-'Arûs it is mentioned that truly asking for forgiveness must be by both word and deed, not by the tongue alone.

The names Ghafûr, Ghaffâr and Ghâfir denote forgiving or protecting, while 'Afûw indicates complete removal or obliteration of the condition.

If Allah had willed to choose a son, He could have chosen what He would of that which He had created. Be He Glorified! He is Allah, the One, the Absolute. He has created the heavens and the earth with the truth; He makes the night cover the day and makes the day overtake the night, and He has made the sun and the moon subservient; each one runs on to an assigned term; now surely He is the Mighty, the GREAT FORGIVER.

(39:4,5)

35) ash-Shakûr

The Most Grateful, The Most Appreciative, The Rewarder of Good Works

The One who is most thankful for righteousness and bestows great rewards for good deeds.

The One who gratefully gives large rewards, even for a small amount of good work.

The One who acknowledges and bountifully rewards all acts of goodness, thankfulness and praise.

The One who frequently and greatly approves, rewards and forgives.

From the root sh-k-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to praise or commend for a benefit or benefits

to acknowledge beneficence

to offer thanks, acknowledgement

to be thankful, grateful

to produce, supply, give forth bountifully

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 35:30

Those who rehearse the Book of Allah, establish regular Prayer, and spend (in Charity) out of what We have provided for them, secretly and openly, hope for a Commerce that will never fail: For He will pay them their meed, nay, He will give them (even) more out of His Bounty; for He is Oft-Forgiving, MOST READY TO APPRECIATE (service).

(35:29-30)

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36) al-'Alî

The Exalted, The Most High

The One Who is above and exceeds all others. The Most High, above whom there is nothing higher.

The One whose rank and station are the Most High.

The One who is above and surpasses all that has ever been, all that there now is, and all that shall ever be.

From the root 'a-l-w which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to be high, elevated, lofty

to be exalted, to rise up, to ascend

to be higher, to exceed, surpass

to overcome, overwhelm

to advance, promote, rise above

to mount, be overtop, eminent

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 2:255

That is because Allah is the (only) Reality, and because whatever else they invoke besides Him is Falsehood; and because Allah, HE IS THE MOST HIGH, Most Great. Seest thou not that the ships sail through the Ocean by the grace of Allah? That He may show you of His Signs? Verily in this are Signs for all who constantly persevere and give thanks. When a wave covers them like the canopy (of clouds), they call to Allah, offering Him sincere devotion, but when He has delivered them safely to land, there are among them those that halt between (right and wrong). But none reject Our Signs except only a perfidious ungrateful (wretch)!

(31:30-32)

37) al-Kabîr

The Most Great, The Greatest, The Perfection of Greatness

The One whose essence is the perfection of greatness. The One who is incomparably great.

The One whose greatness is beyond measure. The One whose nature is Greatness.

The One whose own essence is unimaginably great perfection.

From the root k-b-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:

to be great in rank, dignity, nobility, majesty

to be great in size, vast, formidable

to be great in age, oldest

to be great in learning, most knowing

to have rights above all others

This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 22:62

Kabîr is a less intensive form which honors the One as being the essence of greatness.

Related names:

Jalîl is considered to be greatness in attributes.

Kabîr denotes the One whose essence is greatness.

Azîm is greatness in both attributes and self.

Mutakabbir is an empathic form which denotes actively using rights, privileges, rank and attributes that are above and beyond the rights of everyone else.

The phrase Allâhu Akbar, uses this same k-b-r root and means Allâh is the greatest

Allah doth know what every female (womb) doth bear, by how much the wombs fall short (of their time or number) or do exceed. Every single thing is before His sight, in (due) proportion. He knoweth the Unseen and that which is open: HE IS THE GREAT, the most High. It is the same (to Him) whether any of you conceal his speech or declare it openly; whether he lie hid by night or walk forth freely by day.

(13:8...10)

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Salam All

There is nothing in the Quran that hint to us that Allah has a limited number of 99 names, Allah only mentioned to us a few from His names in the Quran and ordered us to call Him with any of these Husnna names.

Now, before you come attacking me and possibly accuse me of Kufr, here it is from an Arab TV, Al Qahira Al Yawm, sorry it is in Arabic, in that video, an arab researcher came forward and stated that about 20 names of those 99 names as we know them for 1400 years are wrong, he went through and stuided all the possible hadith (heresy) and came up with another 99 names, ironically Al Azhar approved his research, this concluded that the majority of the Muslims are 100% confused, you will even hear the new song they made using the new names:

http://free-islam.com/full/islam/asma2_all..._sa7ee7a_p2.wmv

I guess the researcher was motivated by the heresay that I call "one of the free tickets to heaven", you know if you manage to find those alleged 99 names you will earn a free ticket to heaven, so because it was alleged that those 99 names are already found for hundreds of years, so to give it a bit of merit, he changed 20 of them, therefore he is the only one now who earned that ticket, the previos ones were wrong and there should be no new ones because that researcher already found them, sounds too funny to me if you ask me

Salam all

Edited by AhmedBahgat

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Bismillah

I echo hassan's call, calling Dan to continue...

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Bismillah

Sobhan Allah Ahmad, each time I read a post, you project quite a level of confusion. Ahmad, the hadeeth speaking about one who (Ahsaha) meaning identify the names, shall be admited to Jannah, does not mean one who finds them. Because many of them are already mentioned in Quran, including the widely common names we are all familiar with.

For example, Dhul A`rsh almajeed, Qabele Tawb, DhiTawl (all mentioned in the onset of Surat Ghafer). There are many other that are included in Quran, it is for us to see them and realise them, understand them. May be it is a good idea if u think to yourself what is the purpose of those Names and Attributes. If u dont reply to me Insh a Allah I will attepmt to explain.

Salam All

There is nothing in the Quran that hint to us that Allah has a limited number of 99 names, Allah only mentioned to us a few from His names in the Quran and ordered us to call Him with any of these Husnna names.

Now, before you come attacking me and possibly accuse me of Kufr, here it is from an Arab TV, Al Qahira Al Yawm, sorry it is in Arabic, in that video, an arab researcher came forward and stated that about 20 names of those 99 names as we know them for 1400 years are wrong, he went through and stuided all the possible hadith (heresy) and came up with another 99 names, ironically Al Azhar approved his research, this concluded that the majority of the Muslims are 100% confused, you will even hear the new song they made using the new names:

http://free-islam.com/full/islam/asma2_all..._sa7ee7a_p2.wmv

I guess the researcher was motivated by the heresay that I call "one of the free tickets to heaven", you know if you manage to find those alleged 99 names you will earn a free ticket to heaven, so because it was alleged that those 99 names are already found for hundreds of years, so to give it a bit of merit, he changed 20 of them, therefore he is the only one now who earned that ticket, the previos ones were wrong and there should be no new ones because that researcher already found them, sounds too funny to me if you ask me

Salam all

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Bismillah

Well, so long as the point was raised, it has to be addressed and cleared for whowever comes to this thread, will find the reply Insh a Allah.

First to clear this point, we need to understand what exactly the hadeeth mean.

The hadeeth say:

Abu Huraira reported that the Messenger of Allah said, "Allah has ninety-nine names, one hundred less one. Whoever ahsaha will enter Paradise. (Recorded by al-Bukhari and Muslim)

Please note that in this hadeeth, the translator did not even attempt to translate the word ahsaha.

Let us compare this word with a corresponding same working in Quran and see what exactly does it mean, does it mean like Ahmad is confused, and means to memorise them or otherwise.

In Surat Mariam Allah Used ahsahum

"Verily, He knows each one of them, and has counted them a full counting." (Quran 19:94).

In this noble Ayah, Allah Used Ahsahum wa a`dahum=identified and counted. Which clearly indicates that to indentify something is totally different from counting them and memorising them.

The hadeeth, although a noteworthy point, is that there is another narration that list the 99 names, and this hadeeth is classified as week by many scholars, thus, we will focus on the above mentioned narration.

Ahsahum (identified them, knew them, understood them, recognised them) is a word that needs insightful understanding.

To identify Allah's names and attributes, is to fully comprehend them, to attempt to know Allah The Creator, we can only Know Allah thru understanding and identifying Allah's Names and Attributes.

For example, One of Allah's Names that Dan listed below is Ajjabar.

Ajjbar, actually, can be interpreted in two ways, one is The Compeller, One Who compels others to do what the compeller wants and wills and the other meaning is one who mends.

In some cases, people might come and say, how come Allah Is a compeller? because in Arabic the word can also give the meaning of oppresor. Well, you tell them, if there is not supreme being who can oppress and compel others, who shall put an end to tyrants when they exceed limits and hard human beings. Remember, we are all human beings, thus, if a human being is granted supreior power over others and abuses this power, there must be another whom we can seek refuge to and ask for assistance. This being must be a compellor in an incomparable manner.

But at the same time, the compellor is also One Who mends, mends everything, a broken heart, ...etc.

Another example is Al A`fou: One Who Pardons, we must know that if the Creator Can Pardon, we need to do the same. WE need to learn how to develop morale derived from those names and attributes. this is what identifying them (ahsahum) means.

And this is just one example, I dont want to elaborate, because my dear brother Dan Mash a Allah is already doing this.

The end result is, one who strives to identify those names which are also scattered within the texture of Quran here and there, and sometimes people just read thru them and not realise them, but one who realises them, strives to understand them, comprehend them, develop a full sense as much as possible, live with them. shall be destined to Jannah.

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