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#1

Bismillah


As Salam alaikum


Insha'Allah this will be a humble undertaking of the 99 names of Allah. I started a new thread in order to in sure congruity. Be forewarned that I will edit out posts that do not add to the information here, eg "Great post." If someone has more information about a particular Attribute or Name of Allah, please please post it in order for us all to benefit, insha'Allah


1) ar-Rahmân



The Most Lovingly Beneficent, The Most Kind and Giving, The Most Gracious, The Infinitely Good


The One who continually showers all of creation with blessings and prosperity without any disparity. The One who is most kind, loving and merciful.


The One whose endless, loving mercy is perfect and inclusive. The One who is overflowing with the quality of loving mercy and is continually pouring it upon all of creation.


The One whose perfect mercy and loving beneficence endlessly embrace all of creation. The One who loves and cherishes all of creation. The One who is most loving, gentle and merciful.


From the root r-h-m which has the following classical Arabic connotations:


to have tenderness, gentleness, kindness


to love


to have mercy, to have pity


to show favor and goodness


to have all that is required for beneficence


This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 1:1


The root r-h-m also indicates womb; meaning that which provides protection and nourishment, and that from which all of creation is brought into being.


Rahmân conveys the idea of fullness and extensiveness, indicating the great quality of love and mercy which engulfs all of creation without any effort or request on our part, while Rahîm conveys the idea of constant renewal and giving liberal reward to those who are deserving.


Al-Rahmân is the Beneficent One whose endless outpouring of love and mercy are continually showered upon all of creation, while al-Rahîm is the Merciful One whose love and mercy are manifested as that which is received as the consequence of one's deeds.


According to Ibn Qayyum (1350 AD), Rahmân describes the quality of abounding Grace which is inherent in and inseparable from the Almighty.


In Muhammad Ali's translation of the Qur'ân, he refers to classical sources (as indicated by the initials in parenthesis) who said:


Rahmân and Rahîm are both derived from the root rahmat, signifying tenderness requiring the exercise of beneficence [kindness] ®, and thus comprising the ideas of love and mercy.


Al-Rahmân and al-Rahîm are both active participle nouns of different measures denoting intensiveness of significance, the former being of the measure of fa'lân and indicating the greatest preponderance of the quality of mercy, and the later being of the measure of fa'îl and being expressive of a constant repetition and manifestation of the attribute (AH).


The Prophet is reported to have said: "Al-Rahmân is the beneficent One whose love and mercy are manifested in the creation of the world, and al-Rahîm is the merciful One whose love and mercy are manifested in the state that comes after" (AH), i.e as a consequence of the deeds of men. Thus the former is expressive of the utmost degree of love and generosity, the latter of unbounded and constant favor and mercy.


Lexicologists agree in holding that the former includes both the believer and the unbeliever for its objects, while the latter relates specifically to the believer (LL).


In the Dictionary of the Holy Qur'ân, Abdul Omar quotes from classical resources:


Rahmân is an active participle noun of the measure fa'lân which conveys the idea of fullness and extensiveness and indicates the greatest preponderance of the quality of love and mercy which comprehends the entire universe without regard to our effort or asking, even before we are born. The creation of the sun, the moon, air and water, etc are all there because of this attribute.... the term Rahmân circumscribes the quality of abounding Grace inherent in and inseparable from the Almighty.


Rahîm is in the measure of fa'îl and denotes the idea of constant repetition and giving of a liberal reward to those who deserve it and seek it. The Manifestation of this attribute is in response to and is a result of the action of the human being. That is, Rahîm indicates that which is extremely and continuously loving and merciful, and who is the dispenser of grace and love as a result of our deeds and supplications, and the One in whom the attribute is constantly and [endlessly] repeated.


Your God is One God; there is no God save him, THE BENEFICIENT, the Merciful.



(2:163)

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#2

Bismilah


Asalamalaikum


Ar-Raheem THE MERCIFUL






Mercy is the patience and forgiveness that Allah holds for us and which flows from Him to all His creation, protecting them, preserving them, guiding them, and leading them to goodness. The Mercy of Allah is for everyone, while His justice and punishment are kept for those who turn away from the goodness. The benefits that we receive from others are because of Allah's mercy to them and us.

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#3

2) ar-Rahîm



The Most Merciful, The Most Compassionate


The One who grants even more grace and greater rewards in response to our good actions and high thoughts.


The One who greatly rewards those who use the Divine bounties and beneficence in a good way.


The One who has mercy on the merciful.


From the root r-h-m which has the following classical Arabic connotations:


to have tenderness, gentleness, kindness


to love


to have mercy, to have pity


to show favor and goodness


to have all that is required for beneficence


This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 1:1


The root r-h-m also indicates womb; meaning that which provides protection and nourishment, and that from which all of creation is brought into being.


Rahmân conveys the idea of fullness and extensiveness, indicating the great quality of love and mercy which engulfs all of creation without any effort or request on our part, while Rahîm conveys the idea of constant renewal and giving liberal reward to those who are deserving.


Al-Rahmân is the Beneficent One whose endless outpouring of love and mercy are continually showered upon all of creation, while al-Rahîm is the Merciful One whose love and mercy are manifested as that which is received as the consequence of one's deeds.


According to Ibn Qayyum (1350 AD), Rahîm expresses the continuous manifestation of the Grace in our lives and its effect upon us as a result of our own activities.


In Muhammad Ali's translation of the Qur'ân, he refers to classical sources (as indicated by the initials in parenthesis) who said:


Rahmân and Rahîm are both derived from the root rahmat, signifying tenderness requiring the exercise of beneficence [kindness] ®, and thus comprising the ideas of love and mercy.


Al-Rahmân and al-Rahîm are both active participle nouns of different measures denoting intensiveness of significance, the former being of the measure of fa'lân and indicating the greatest preponderance of the quality of mercy, and the later being of the measure of fa'îl and being expressive of a constant repetition and manifestation of the attribute (AH).


The Prophet is reported to have said: "Al-Rahmân is the beneficent One whose love and mercy are manifested in the creation of the world, and al-Rahîm is the merciful One whose love and mercy are manifested in the state that comes after" (AH), i.e as a consequence of the deeds of men. Thus the former is expressive of the utmost degree of love and generosity, the latter of unbounded and constant favor and mercy.


Lexicologists agree in holding that the former includes both the believer and the unbeliever for its objects, while the latter relates specifically to the believer (LL).


In the Dictionary of the Holy Qur'ân, Abdul Omar quotes from classical resources:


Rahmân is an active participle noun of the measure fa'lân which conveys the idea of fullness and extensiveness and indicates the greatest preponderance of the quality of love and mercy which comprehends the entire universe without regard to our effort or asking, even before we are born. The creation of the sun, the moon, air and water, etc are all there because of this attribute.... the term Rahmân circumscribes the quality of abounding Grace inherent in and inseparable from the Almighty.


Rahîm is in the measure of fa'îl and denotes the idea of constant repetition and giving of a liberal reward to those who deserve it and seek it. The Manifestation of this attribute is in response to and is a result of the action of the human being. That is, Rahîm indicates that which is extremely and continuously loving and merciful, and who is the dispenser of grace and love as a result of our deeds and supplications, and the One in whom the attribute is constantly and [endlessly] repeated.


He it is who sent down clear revelations unto His Slave (Muhammad), that He may bring you forth from darkness unto light; and lo! for you, Allah is Full of Pity, MERCIFUL.



(57:9)

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#4

3) Al-Malik



The Sovereign



~


Al-Malik means king, which is a name of Allah,


because Allah is the King of all kings.


Allah is the One and only Ruler of all worlds


and creations of this world and the Hereafter.


~

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#5

3) al-Malik



The King, The Ruler


The One who is king of all beings. The One who is the owner and ruler of this world.


The One who has supreme authority, and who is relied upon by everyone.


The One who has all ruling power over all beings, and is ruled by none.


From the root m-l-k which has the following classical Arabic connotations:


to possess, to own exclusively


to exercise authority to command


to have power over, command, reign


to have dominion over, to have ruling power


to have kingship


This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:23


The name Malik signifies king, while the name the name Mâlik, by virtue of the â which intensifies the meaning, signifies something that is in some way greater than a king, and is often translated as master or lord. However, the exact differences between these names are not universally agreed upon.


By some traditions, al-Malik is considered to be the owner and king of this world, or of the beings of this world, while Mâlik al-Mulk is considered to be the supreme lord and master of all worlds, the known and the unknown, the manifest and the un-manifest.


Now Allah be Exalted THE TRUE KING! There is no God save Him, the Lord of the Throne of Grace.



(23:116)


4) Quddûs



The Most Holy, The Most Pure, The All-Perfect


The One who is pure, spotless, without blemish or fault.


The One who is far from, and untouched by, worldly imperfections or faults.


The One whose essence and attributes are of unimaginable purity and perfection.


The One who is beyond all human understanding of purity, perfection and holiness.


From the root q-d-s which has the following classical Arabic connotations:


to be pure, clean, spotless


to be far removed from impurity or imperfection


to be holy, sacred, hallowed


This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:23


The ancient roots of the Arabic word Quddûs, as well as the Hebrew word Kadosh, point toward that which is set apart, different, that which is 'other'. Thus, al-Quddûs is known as the One who is set apart, distinctly different and separate from all worldly imperfections, sins and faults, the One whose perfection and righteousness are so 'other' that they cannot be grasped by mankind, the truly Blessed One.


The name al-Quddûs describes the unique, unimaginable purity and perfection that is Allâh, the One whose goodness and righteousness are beyond our understanding.


According to al-Qurturbi, the name al-Quddûs also describes the One who is glorified and revered by the angels.


The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines the word holy as:


Holy -- Exalted or worthy of complete devotion as one perfect in goodness and righteousness.


Whatever is in the heavens and on earth, doth declare the Praises and Glory of Allah; the Sovereign, THE HOLY ONE, the Exalted in Might, the Wise.



(62:1)


5) Salâm



The Source of Peace, The Flawless, The Source of Wholeness and Well-Being


The One who is perfect, whole, prosperous and content.


The One who is the source of all peace, wholeness and safety.


The One who has rendered all of creation to be perfect, whole, prosperous and content.


The One whose creation is free of imperfections, free of faults and free of error.


From the root s-l-m which has the following classical Arabic connotations:


to be peaceful, quiet, tranquil, content, friendly, reconciled


to be free from imperfections, free from faults, complete, whole, sound


to be safe, secure, well, healthy, prosperous


This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:23


This ancient Semitic root of s-l-m implies every manner of wholeness, completeness and prosperity.


Many seek peace by struggling, battling and trying to impose their will on others, yet external peace will only prevail as a reflection of inner peace. The only path to outer peace is awareness of the tranquil depths of inner peace, and the only source of such inner peace is the One known as as-Salâm.


According to Râghib the word Islam, which arises form this same s-l-m root, means to enter into salm... which means to enter into peace, or to enter into wholeness. That is, the word Islam means to be at peace with or reconciled with the ways and decrees of Allâh, and is often described as self-resignation, surrender or submission to the will of Allâh.


He is Allah, than whom there is no other God, the Sovereign Lord, The Holy One, PEACE, The Keeper Of Faith, the Guardian, the Majestic, the Compeller, the Superb. Glorified be Allah from all that they ascribe as partner (unto Him).



(59:23)

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#6

6) al-Mu'min



The Remover of Fear, The Giver of Tranquility, The Source of Faith


The One who faithfully bestows the gifts of peace, safety and security.


The One who grants freedom from fear.


The One who illuminates the heart with faith. The One who is most trustworthy.


From the root â-m-n which has the following classical Arabic connotations:


to be secure, safe, free from fear


to be quiet, tranquil


to grant protection, safeguard


to be trusted, trustworthy


to believe in


This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:23


The word îmân, often simply translated simply as faith or belief, comes from this same â-m-n root, and could well be translated as has been granted peace and security.


The word âmîn, often translated simply as amen, also comes from this same â-m-n root, and could be translated as in this we trust or in this we are free from fear.


The root â-m-n root is also the original source of the name al-Muhaymin (the protector).


Related names:


Raqîb refers to the One who has the attribute of watchfulness.


Wakîl refers to the One who is the trusted administrator.


Hafîz refers to the One who protects and preserves.


Mâni' - the One who protects and defends against harmful situations.


Muhaymin refers to the One who is the ever-watchful guardian and protector.


Mu'min - The One who grants security and freedom from fear.


He is Allah, than whom there is no other God, the Sovereign Lord, The Holy One, Peace, THE KEEPER OF FAITH, the Guardian, the Majestic, the Compeller, the Superb. Glorified be Allah from all that they ascribe as partner (unto Him).



(59:23)


7) al-Muhaymin



The Protector, The Bestower of Security, The Guardian, The Safeguarder


The One who ensures well-being. The One who extends wings of Love to cover and protect creation.


The One who is ever watchful. The One who protects and guards.


The One who offers peace and security. The One who proclaims the Truth.


From the root h-y-m-n which has the following classical Arabic connotations:


to watch over, oversee, protect, guard


to be a witness to


to offer security and peace


to determine what is true


to extend a wing (like a hen protecting her chicks)


This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:23


According to E.W. Lane, the root of Muhaymin was originally â-m-n, the same root as al-Mu'min (remover of fear).


Related names:


Raqîb refers to the One who has the attribute of watchfulness.


Wakîl refers to the One who is the trusted administrator.


Hafîz refers to the One who protects and preserves.


Mâni' - the One who protects and defends against harmful situations.


Muhaymin refers to the One who is the ever-watchful guardian and protector.


Mu'min - The One who grants security and freedom from fear.


Also written as al-Muhaimin.


He is Allah, than whom there is no other God, the Sovereign Lord, the Holy One, Peace, The Keeper Of Faith, THE GUARDIAN, the Majestic, the Compeller, the Superb. Glorified be Allah from all that they ascribe as partner (unto Him).



(59:23)

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#7

8) al-'Azîz



The Mighty, The Strong, Dignified and Powerful, The Eminent


The One who is the most Powerful and most Cherished. The victorious One whose strength, glory and power are overwhelming and cannot be overcome or resisted.


The One whose dignity, majesty and power are unique, precious and unattainable by mankind. The One whose respectability and nobility are above all others. The One who is the ultimate in honor and nobility.


The One who has complete mastery over all of creation. The One who overcomes everything. The One who is incomparable and unparalleled. The One who is the cherished source of all strength, power and potency.


From the root '-z-z which has the following classical Arabic connotations:


to be mighty, potent, strong, powerful


to be high, elevated, noble, exalted


to be honorable, noble, glorious, illustrious


to be indomitable, invincible


to be respected, cherished, dear


to be scarce, rare, precious, unattainable


This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:23


Also written as 'Azîzun.


Blessed is He in Whose hand is the kingdom, and He has power over all things, Who created death and life that He may try you which of you is best in deeds; and He is THE MIGHTY, the Forgiving, Who created the seven heavens one above another; you see no incongruity in the creation of the Beneficent Allah; then look again, can you see any disorder?



(67:1-3)


9) al-Jabbâr



The Restorer, The Repairer, The All-Compelling, The Irresistible


The One who irresistibly restores all of creation to soundness and sufficiency.


The One who repairs, reforms and completes. The One who irresistibly compels things to be set aright.


The One who compels each and every thing according to divine will, yet is never compelled.


The One who is high, above all creation and utterly irresistible.


From the root j-b-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:


to restore something to sound, right or good state


to bring back to normal, reform


to benefit, to confer a benefit


to be supreme, high, above all of creation


to be compelling, irresistible


This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:23


The essence of the root j-b-r is the irresistible restoration of something, and the name al-Jabbâr describes the nature of the One who is the ultimate restorer of the soundness, wholeness and righteousness of all things. For a human being, any claim to such irresistible power would be false pride and arrogance, but for Allâh it is simply the truth.


He is Allah, than whom there is no other God, the Sovereign Lord, The Holy One, Peace, the Keeper of Faith, the Guardian, the Majestic, THE COMPELLER, the Superb. Glorified be Allah from all that they ascribe as partner (unto Him).



(59:23)


10) al-Mutakabbir



The Supremely Great, The Possessor of all Rights, The Perfection of Greatness


The One who is supremely great. The One who is greater than all of creation.


The One who manifests greatness in all things and in all ways.


The One who has rights, privileges and attributes which others have not.


From the root k-b-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:


to be great in size, rank or dignity


to be great in size, to be vast, formidable


to be great in age, oldest


to be great in dignity, noble, majestic


to be great in learning, most knowing


to have rights above all others


This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:23


Mutakabbir is an empathic form of the root k-b-r which denotes actively using rights, privileges and attributes that are above and beyond the rights of everyone else. In mankind, this would be called pride or arrogance, but for the One this is simply the truth.


Al-Qurtubi reported that this name was understood to mean Grand, Great One.


Related names:


Jalîl is considered to be greatness in attributes.


Kabîr denotes the One whose essence is greatness.


Azîm is greatness in both attributes and self.


Mutakabbir is an empathic form which denotes actively using rights, privileges, rank and attributes that are above and beyond the rights of everyone else.


He is Allah, than whom there is no other God, the Sovereign Lord, the Holy One, Peace, The Keeper Of Faith, the Guardian, the Majestic, the Compeller, THE SUPERB. Glorified be Allah from all that they ascribe as partner (unto Him).



(59:23)

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#8

11
Al-Khaaliq



The Creator



~



Al-Khaaliq comes from the word Khalaq which means to create. Allah is the One Who has created the heavens and the earth, Who has created night and day, life and death.


~

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#9

11) al-Khâliq



The Creator, The Planner


The One who determines and creates according to the proper measure and proportion of each thing. The One who plans and determines how, when and where to create.


The One whose works are perfectly suited, appropriate, fitting and proper. The One who creates something from nothing. The One who creates both the inner and the outer in just proportions.


The One who brings things into existence from a state of non-existence. The One who has the power to change things back and forth between the states of existing and non-existing.


From the root kh-l-q which has the following classical Arabic connotations:


to measure accurately


to determine the proper measure or proportion for something


to proportion one thing according to another


to create something based on a pattern or model which one has devised


to bring a thing into existence from non-existence


This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:24


Related names:


Bâri' denotes the way the One works with substances, often creating from existing matter, making and evolving that which is free and clear of any other thing, free and clear of imperfections.


Badî' denotes the One who creates in wonderful, amazingly original ways that have no precedent whatsoever, ways that are awesome innovation.


Khâliq denotes the One who continues to plan, measure out and create, and who has the power to change things from non-existing to existing.


Musawwir denotes the One who arranges forms and colors, and who is the shaper of beauty.


Mubdi' denotes the One who starts or begins all things, or that which has precedence given to it.


Also expressed as al-Khallâq (great creator).


The Originator of the heavens and the earth! How can He have a child, when there is for Him no consort, when He created all things and is Aware of all things? Such is Allah, your Lord. There is no god save Him, THE CREATOR of all things, so worship Him. And He taketh care of all things. Vision comprehends Him not, and He comprehends (all) vision. He is the Subtile, the Aware.



(6:101,102,103)


The similitude of Jesus before Allah is as that of Adam; HE CREATED HIM from dust, then said to him "Be !": and he was.


(3:59)


12) al-Bâri'



The Maker, The Producer, The Evolver, The Maker from Nothing


The One who creates form out of nothing. The One who creates with no model or similarity.


The One who evolves and re-creates that which exists, both physically and spiritually.


The One who sends new forms into existence.


The One who manifests that which is in perfect harmony and proportion, without blemish or fault.


From the root b-r-' which has the following classical Arabic connotations:


to create, to form out of nothing, to manifest


to create using pre-existing matter, evolve


to be individual, free and clear of another thing


to be free and clear of fault or blemish


This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:24


The Qur'ân commentary of al-Baydâwi says that the primary meaning of the root b-r-' is to denote a thing's becoming free and clear of another thing, either by by being released or by being created.


The ancient Semitic roots point toward a manifestation or emanation which is the fruition of a great power, and which contains the potentiality of that which brought it into being.


Related names:


Bâri' denotes the way the One works with substances, often creating from existing matter, making and evolving that which is free and clear of any other thing, free and clear of imperfections.


Badî' denotes the One who creates in wonderful, amazingly original ways that have no precedent whatsoever, ways that are awesome innovation.


Khâliq denotes the One who continues to plan, measure out and create, and who has the power to change things from non-existing to existing.


Musawwir denotes the One who arranges forms and colors, and who is the shaper of beauty.


Mubdi' denotes the One who starts or begins all things, or that which has precedence given to it.


And remember Moses said to his people: O my people! Ye have indeed wronged yourselves by your worship of the calf: So turn (in repentance) to your MAKER, and slay yourselves (the wrong-doers); that will be better for you in the sight of your MAKER. Then He turned towards you (in forgiveness): For He is Oft-Returning, Most Merciful.



(2:54)


13) al-Musawwir



The Fashioner, The Bestower of Forms, The Shaper


The One who is the fashioner and former of each and every thing in all of creation.


The One who has given everything in creation a special inclination or desire.


The One who has given everything a special form and a special manner whereby it is distinguished.


From the root s-w-r which has the following classical Arabic connotations:


to make something incline, lean or bend towards


to form, fashion, sculpt, imagine or picture something


to have an inclination or desire towards something


This name is used in the Qur'ân. For example, see 59:24


Related names:


Bâri' denotes the way the One works with substances, often creating from existing matter, making and evolving that which is free and clear of any other thing, free and clear of imperfections.


Badî' denotes the One who creates in wonderful, amazingly original ways that have no precedent whatsoever, ways that are awesome innovation.


Khâliq denotes the One who continues to plan, measure out and create and who has the power to change things from one state to another.


Musawwir denotes the One who arranges forms and colors, and who is the shaper of beauty.


Mubdi' denotes the One who starts or begins all things, or that which has precedence given to it.


Also written as Musauwir.


Allah... Surely nothing is hidden from Him in the earth or in the heaven. He it is WHO SHAPES you in the wombs as He likes; there is no god but He, the Mighty, the Wise.



(3:5,6)

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#10

Al-Ghaffaar



The Great Forgiver



~



Allah is the Great Forgiver because He covers or hides the sins of His servants. Allah forgives those who seek his pardon.


~

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